I have been fascinated with the Waldorf festivals ever since my first introduction to this educational philosophy. I decided that these celebrations (Michaelmas, Martinmas, etc.) must be a definitive part of my child’s educational experience. Unfortunately, my good intentions have not always come to fruition. First and foremost, though I love the festivals conceptually, they do not feel natural. They feel more like a contrivance. Christmas, Thanksgiving, and the other mass-celebrated holidays feel right in the sense that they are apart of my childhood family’s tradition and the tradition of the greater culture at large. Waldorf holidays such as May Day or Midsummer lack a certain authenticity for me, and it has been difficult to overcome. Additionally, it is often difficult to remember the dates associated with these holidays, and I have found myself at a loss as to what I should be doing on these days.

Michaelmas is just one such holiday whose celebration evades us. I purchased my first Waldorf curricula right after Michaelmas had passed. I had never heard of it before, and I lamented the fact that I missed the opportunity to celebrate it with my son. I endeavored to celebrate it with great fanfare in 2010. I became more and more excited for Michaelmas as I read blog posts about others’ celebrations, purchased craft materials, and downloaded dragon stories. Unfortunately, as luck would have it, life circumstances rose up against me and quashed my ability–and mood–to celebrate. Fortunately (or so I thought), I noticed that Michaelmas could be celebrated in late September *or* early October. I decided I would opt for the second date, but this too fell through. Thus, our Michaelmas pinata has sat unfinished for months. Maybe this year,….

Michaelmas Pinata

Michaelmas Pinata

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