I was entirely prepared not to like The Indian in the Cupboard, the 1995 movie featuring a toy that comes to life. I did not know what to expect, but I assumed it wouldn’t be more than mediocre at best. Instead, I was treated to a better than mediocre movie. While not great in any real sense, I liked the movie’s overall theme. The movie was less of a portrayal (and exploitation) of Native American culture, than a study on the dignity and value of individuals no matter how insignificant they may seem. Rather than fill the alloted time with titillating and meaningless action, the film portrayed the interior struggle of a boy who realizes that the diminutive man that comes to life has passed out of the realm of plaything to living, breathing human being with his own right to a self-directed life. I’m likely making the movie sound better than it actually was. However, the lesson is dramatized in a way that young children can understand, and I believe my son got something out of it. We watched the film on Thanksgiving, and he has been asking for what he calls “The Native American Under the Covers” several times now.

The Indian in the Cupboard

The Indian in the Cupboard

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